Thursday, May 21, 2015

Childhood Flashbacks, Stephen King, and Visceral Toy Stories of Terror!

I grew up loving Barbie. My closet was filled with Barbies and Skippers and Kens. These toys had dream houses and cars and closets with more clothes than any human being I've ever met, before or since. My parents spent hundreds -- if not thousands? -- of dollars on these dolls and all their accessories. 

I cannot emphasize enough how much I loved these toys. Hours and hours were spent making up adventures for them to go through. Proms. Murder mysteries. Fashion shows. Rock concerts. (Jem and Holograms was also popular at this point in time and I even had a cassette of the music.)

Needless to say, if the Barbie animated movies had been out at this time, I would've been all over those too. 

Then, in third grade, I had a friend -- Dionne -- who was a terrorist of a storyteller. 

We were at the park. (I remember this distinctly. It was the park we referred to as The Wooden Park because all of the equipment was, you guessed it, made of wood.) We were sitting on the swings, just talking, like kids actually do. We'd been playing some kind of Pretend, which I'm sure involved pretending to be Barbie. 

And then Dionne decided to tell me about her cousin, who lived in Puerto Rico. I'm not sure why this detail is important, but I think it's because it made the whole story seem magical enough to be real. I've never forgotten it.  

(Before I continue, I should let you know that I was a very gullible, shy, generally frightened child. I freakin' cried when teachers would call my name during attendance. You'll be happy to know that I'm now a gullible, more outgoing, generally cautiously nervous adult.)

Anyway, Dionne's cousin had a birthday party where she'd received this Barbie. I want to say that Dionne was detail oriented enough that it was a Peaches and Cream Barbie, but I could have filled that in with my own detail-oriented imagination. All well and good so far?

That night, the night of her birthday after all the presents have been opened, the cousin is woken up by something crawling on her chest. She looks down and sees Barbie (the Peaches and Cream Barbie in my imagination, remember). 

Devil in a Peach Dress


Then Barbie tells Dionne's cousin, "Get me some coffee."

Dionne's cousin, scared to death, obeys and gets Barbie her coffee. (I should've probably questioned the veracity of Dionne's story here. As a seven year old, I had no idea how to make coffee and Dionne's cousin was supposedly our age. But, different seven year olds have different skill sets I guess.) Everything's fine. 

The next night, the same thing happens. And, again Dionne's cousin gets the coffee.

On the third night -- man, Dionne does have a good grasp of storytelling...setting up the pattern and then breaking it...gotta admire it -- Dionne's cousin refuses to get the coffee. 

In the morning Dionne's aunt goes to wake the kid up and finds her child dead on the bed. Carved into the cousin's chest -- as if carved with a small, sharp, plastic ninja hand from hell (see picture above!) -- was "You should have got me my coffee!"

Ummmm. Yeah. I totally freaked out. And the girl -- me -- who loved Barbie, worshipped Barbie, owned miles and miles of Barbies with accessories, and had survived endless nights sharing a room with dozens of Barbies, REFUSED to have anything to do with them again. I locked those bitches in a closet and refused to play with them. Eventually, we donated them to my mom's first grade classroom.

My mom still hasn't quite forgiven me. 

I'm bringing this up now because I just finished reading Stephen King's short story "Chattery Teeth," which you can find in Nightmares and Dreamscapes. This is the second story by King that I've read involving toys. The other one is "Battleground," involving those plastic army soldiers we all had and promptly lost when we were little, which you can find in Night Shift.

As I was reading "Chattery Teeth" I was disturbed, but not really frightened. It takes a lot to scare me in a story nowadays. But, being disturbed, I wondered why? I remembered being equally disturbed by "Battleground." 

Seriously, when you stop to think about it, these are not the stories that should be disturbing you as a reader. 

Then it occurred to me that I was disturbed because of the details King used in those stories. The wind-up element of the Chattery Teeth. The way the teeth clamp down. Even the stupid little orange feet with spats that move inevitably forward. The weapons used by the tiny soldiers in "Battleground." The helicopters that fire missiles. 

Like the carving plastic hands in Dionne's story, there's something visceral and real about those details. We've all touched the novelty toys and we know how those plastic bits feel. King does a really good job of bringing those elements into those two particular stories -- which, honestly, otherwise feel like they're novelties in and of themselves. That's what I was responding to.

And those details may have caused flashbacks to my own childhood fears. 

Did you get terrorized by a similar story when you were little? What author brings that kind of disturbing detail to life for you?

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Two Days of Nothing -- I'm Scared the Crickets Are Staging a Revolution

Yesterday and today have been the first days in a looooooong while where I haven't had to do anything. There's no rehearsal, no performance, no kids activities, no nothing. Which left me feeling a little weird because I felt like there was something I was forgetting. Something that needed to get done that wasn't getting done. Something that someone, somewhere would yell at me for not finishing. 

But, nope. 

There aren't even crickets chirping. It's like a strange vacuum of time and space. 

There is writing to work on and I'm thrilled to actually have the time to do it. And, look!, blogging. 

But...

The amount of quiet, the sheer quantity of 'nothing to do' is making me a little paranoid.

*looks over shoulder*

Nope. I haven't forgotten anything. 

*looks to the left, looks to the right*

The children are definitely behaving and not putting undue demands on my time at the moment. (Did something get put in their food?)

*peers under the bed*

I guess I could clean....

Ha! Who am I kidding? That ain't gonna happen. 

*checks the yard, down the street, the roof*

Still no crickets chirping. I hope they're not planning anything. Because I'm gonna go write. 

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Story Sharing on the Playground; or, Talking with Perfect Strangers About the Miracle of Your Vagina

Last week SET opened Motherhood Out Loud, which is a series of monologues about motherhood. We're going into our last weekend, which means I've seen this show...a lot by this point. And every single time I see this play, I'm reminded of my own experiences on several playgrounds.

My oldest kid is thirteen now (shut up) which means that, between him and my younger kiddo, I've been to lots of different playgrounds, met several other mothers, made friends with more than one of those mothers, and have heard that special high-pitched note that girls somehow manage to hit more than I ever care to. 

It's struck me more than once, and after directing this series of pieces it's struck me harder. 

Once you're a mom on a playground, you will talk about the miracle of your vagina. 

Not in so many words. No. But you will talk about it. Because the thing you generally have in common with the other mommies on the playground is the fact that, one way or another, if you have a biological child, you got that child out of your body somehow. After the hours of being with your small child, in your desperation to communicate with an actual adult, you will try to latch on to anything, anything that will allow you to bond with another adult. The easiest thing for mommies is giving birth. 

Here's the thing that kills me: that is one private, medically revelatory,  personal, and generally gross moment in a woman's history. 

And we share those stories constantly with perfect strangers. 

I had one woman tell me about her experience birthing one twin vaginally and the second via C-section. I've heard stories about rips, tears, and broken hip bones -- stuff that would make a Viking shudder. AmIright? 

The thing is -- there are women whom I've met, and all I know about them is how their vaginas worked to deliver their child. I can't remember their names, or where they live, or even the sex of their child. But I can remember the stories and relate to them. It's kind of mind-boggling.

Yup, you're really hearing about how a woman's vagina works. Conversations that we weren't 'allowed' to have, suddenly, PRESTO! we have a child and we're allowed to have that conversation.

But, I'm kinda thinking that's the backwards way to do this thing. Women who already have children already know how it works and what surprises lay in store...but non-mommies who want to eventually become mommies should really be hearing these stories. It'll save them a lot of surprises.

(For example, in my case, I was unprepared for the blood. There's copious amounts of blood after giving birth. You go nine months without a period and you make up for it all in a couple weeks. It's gross. I would have been really happy to have been prepped for that beforehand.) 

So maybe we should be bombarding our childless friends with this information? Maybe not. Probably Reddit has some kind of discussion going somewhere....  

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

How Do You Bounce Back From Time Away?

Last Tuesday I outlined my plan to exercise my writing muscles back into shape. Now, I haven't written much in a few months so I'm feeling like I'm doing some heavy lifting without warming up. And apparently I'm not the only one feeling like this at the moment.

One of my good friends, a playwright, just asked Facebook (the All Knowing) about how to get back into the writing saddle.

There was some straight up, common sense advice:

Just do it and see what sticks.
Don't put any pressure on it, sit there until something comes.
Write fast.
Blow something up.
Copy someone else's first line and then finish the story yourself.

I shared Chuck Wendig's "A Smattering Of Stupid Writer Tricks" with her.

But I want to know what you do. Have you ever taken a long break and then tried to get back into the swing of things? How'd you do it?

Thursday, May 7, 2015

Directing Isn't So Different From Being a Mom


Opening tonight: My directorial debut! (Well, my co-directorial debut -- my co-director Sarah Shaver is AMAZEBALLS.)

Over the last couple weeks I have had the pleasure and the panic of trying to shape a series of short scenes and monologues about motherhood. Motherhood Out Loud is a beautiful collection of pieces written by some of the best playwrights around. I'ts striking to me because there's a great mix of hilarity and tear-inducing emotions.

So there I am: in an open theatre space filled with talented actors, armed with this strong script.

Annnnnnd I'm scared to death I'll fuck it up.

All of it.

Which makes me think that directing is not so different from motherhood.

As a parent, I really really really hope I'm not fucking my kids up. I hope they feel loved and safe. I hope they feel like I'm someone they can talk to. I hope no one ever hurts them. I hope they are happy. I hope they are healthy. I hope that when I give advice or discipline that it's helping to develop their character and make them stronger human beings. Most of all, I just hope for them.

With directing, there are more specific concerns -- concerns about if the story is being told well, concerns about lines, concerns about lights burning out.

But as a director, I really really really hope I'm not fucking people up. I hope the actors and the technicians feel able to create in a loving, safe place. I hope they feel they can approach me with problems or observations. I hope the audience loves them. I hope they are happy. I hope they are healthy. I hope that when I give notes or assign tasks that it's helping to develop their work and make them stronger performers. And mostly, I just hope.

I also think that directing is like motherhood in the fact that, a lot of times, you just have to bluff.

Yes. I do know what I'm talking about. Really. Just trust me.

Then hope to God I'm not wrong.

In the end, you have to trust that your kids and your crew will take care of business. You just have to set them free and say "I did my best."

If you're in the Springs, come check out this lovely piece of theatre. I'll be thrilled to hear what you think.



Tuesday, May 5, 2015

Deadlines and Word Counts and Themes: Oh My!

Since November a huge amount of my creative energy has gone into my theatre instead of my writing. Which makes me neither happy nor sad, it's just how it worked out -- the focus went to one area and I produced good work in one medium instead of another.

At the moment I'm trying to 'restore balance to the force' (Happy Belated Star Wars Day by the way!) by picking up the pen and writing. Happiness!

Only it feels like this:


It's not like I've forgotten how to write. I can still string words together good. Sometimes I even remember good words well. And I have the added bonus of knowing what I want to write and how I want to write it. But I feel super out-of-shape. Ya know? Like a marathon runner --

Okay. I know nothing about how a marathon runner feels. I hate running.

But I was a swimmer. I know how to swim. I haven't forgotten the strokes. I know all the methods for moving through water. At the moment, however, I would get my ass handed to me if I tried to race anyone and/or participated in any kind of lap swim longer than fifteen minutes.

So it is with writing at present.

The remedy for lax writing muscles, I've decided, is the same remedy for the above sports analogy (the swimmy analogy, not the runny analogy): practice. Specialized practice.

To get back into the swing of things, I'm turning to Duotrope's calendar of deadlines for magazines with themed issues. My thought process in this comes from my writing teacher David Keplinger -- whose workshops always had a 'box' put around them. The idea was -- whether the box consisted of a theme, particular subject matter, or a specific exercise -- that if you put a box around the writing, you stop thinking about all the things that slow you down.

If you're working within a box, you can't waste time thinking about Am I good enough? Am I saying what I want to say? How long should this be? Those questions just kinda fall away and you work on staying within the parameters.

Generally, I'm pretty good about working within a box but the big-ass WIP I'm in the middle of is too big of a box to jump back into. I have a little too much playtime in there and I'd like to get back into the structural elements and I think Duotrope's calendar is perfect for that because:

1. Deadlines. I have to finish in a certain period of time in order to submit my piece. I chose things with pretty up-and-coming deadlines so I don't have time to think. Write fast. Write hard.

2. Word counts. The magazines have limits set for the words. I don't have to debate within myself about how long or short I want it to be -- there's a definitive stopping place.

3. Themes. These make it simple for me to come up with a storyline. I can't hem and haw for endless amounts of time about What Idea Shall I Write? With themes dictated, I'm forced to be creative in the idea department.

I feel like these are good little workouts to get back into shape. Once I've pounded out a couple, I'll feel more comfortable jumping back into the big ol' book that's waiting for new words.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Sarah Ruhl's Stage Directions

Dead Man's Cell Phone Production Poster (Designed by: Linda Nichols)

Sarah Ruhl is the second most performed playwright in the United States -- second only to the Bard his own self. This is the last weekend that it will be performed in Colorado Springs at the Springs Ensemble Theatre.

In other words: this is the last weekend I'll be playing Jean.

I cannot tell you how much I love doing this play. If I could, I would perform it every day. A lot of that love is due to Sarah Ruhl's writing style, which, as a writer, I sooooo appreciate.

One of the coolest things Ruhl does as a playwright is her stage directions. They're almost like poetry themselves. And, while specific, they still let the director, designers, and performers go to town creatively.

This is where there's a big ol' difference between writing for the stage versus writing for movies versus writing novels.

Movies tend to break things out simply: Character A and Character B fight. (And there you have about twenty minutes of any Transformer  movie.)

Novels (short stories, etc.), of course, will spell all of that out: Character A hurls a chair at Character B. The chair cracks in half over Character B's head, carving a gash across B's forehead. And on and on -- perhaps with Character A is drinking a gin and tonic.

This is how Sarah Ruhl chooses to present a fight scene in Dead Man's Cell Phone:

A struggle for the gun. 
Perhaps an extended fight sequence
with some crawling and hair pulling. 

That magical word 'perhaps' leaves everything open but she's also managed to convey exactly what this particular scene needs. Sure, you can do an extended fight scene and both Character A and Character B can be drop dead serious about what's going on -- that's definitely one way to go. But the other is to follow that 'perhaps' and you get something far more in tune with what the rest of the text suggests: this is a kinda ridiculous situation -- but there's a gun so you better take it kinda seriously. Somewhere in between is the sweet spot...and the writing in the stage directions hits that note just perfectly.

Something else that happens in Ruhl's writing -- and is noticeable in the above passage -- is that she breaks lines the same way poet's do.

A struggle for the gun. This is very straightforward. And it's its own paragraph/line/sentence. Note there's a period.

Perhaps an extended fight sequence This fragment is left hanging. But it's a singular thought too. This is like a line of poetry -- a piece that is it's own thing but is still connected to the next line...which is kind of a turn.

An 'extended fight sequence' call to mind something very serious. Then Ruhl changes the tone with the next line:

with some crawling and hair pulling. She finishes the thought with something unexpected -- which is how the fight sequence should work.

We know from the rest of the play that at least one of these characters should just not be involved in a fight sequence. Because it's ridiculous. Absurd. And the stage directions are written in a way that reflects this. It could be written like this:

A struggle for the gun. Perhaps an extended fight sequence with some crawling and pulling.

Reading it that way feels different. (At least to me.) To me, this way feels more throwaway.

I once heard an interview with Ruhl and she said that one of the most frustrating things about watching performances was that the director/actors/designers were so busy trying to put their own stamp on a piece that they didn't worry about 'birthing' the story. She already wrote everything down. The story is there...and she left enough flexibility to give the director/actors/designers to come up with something really creative. So why not just tell the story?

Our director said that if we have any questions, to look to the script first. Everything is there. And it is. We've taken Ruhl's notes and tried to make magic. I think we've done pretty good too. Here's a review from Broadway World Denver. If you're in Colorado Springs this weekend -- you can snag tickets (hopefully) at 719-357-3080.

Thursday, January 1, 2015

The Year In Reading 2014 and Onward to 2015

According to Goodreads -- my only real authority on anything reading-wise -- I read 64 books in 2014. My first thought upon seeing that was, "Bummer. I didn't read the 100 I set out to read."

My second thought was "Whoa! 64!"

I also made a pretty good dent in what I dub my Complete Works Of Project. Basically, I said I'd work my way through William Shakespeare, Stephen King, and Jane Austen. And work I did. I haven't hit the end of Will and Steve, but I did read all of Jane's Completed Works. (I still have to read her juvenalia and some of her incomplete works to say I've read everything...but that's a project for a different time.)

Surely, having read so much last year, I must have an opinion on some things, yes?

Why yes I do.

Jane Austen
The woman is, of course, a bad ass. My faves are Northanger Abbey, Emma, and the quintessential
Pride and Prejudice. I also really enjoyed Persuasion, which is kind of like a baby P&P. Sense and Sensibility gets an 'okay' as far as I'm concerned.

I have to tell you, five outta six ain't bad.
Jane's Mistake Park



But, man Mansfield Park can go suck it. What a preachy load of preachiness. Everyone's a jerk. When you're cheering for the rival, there's a problem.









Stephen King
I've read almost 40 King books at this point -- including his two newest ones Revival and Mr. Mercedes. (See? Say you're gonna read a living writer and they come out with multiple books in a year, just to make sure you can't quite catch up...ever.)

Revival -- what a dark bummer of a book. A great bildingsroman, but dark. Damn. Not even horrific. Just DARK.

Mr. Mercedes -- more of a mystery/thriller kind of romp. Easily on par with J.K. Rowling's new nom-de-plume Richard Galbraith stuff. So, not bad. Not great. But not bad.






William Shakespeare
All I'll say is that I'm reading his early comedies right now and I'm trying not to hate him as a misogynistic butthead. And this is after coming off early histories....

Faves of 2014
The Martian by Andy Weir (badass survival on Mars)


The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving (surprisingly funnier than I anticipated)


The Secret Place by Tana French (the ultimate frenemy book)


What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions  by Randall Munroe (non-fiction, crazy shit)

Not so Faves of 2014
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (sorry, Jane, this one's a stinker)
Writing with the Master by Tony Vanderwarker (the story of how John Grisham didn't actually help a dude write a novel)


Now that 2014 is over and in the books (ha!) time for my goals for 2015.
1. Continue to plug away at William Shakespeare and Stephen King.
2. I've added in Virginia Woolf.
3. 56 books total for 2015 -- not necessarily all Complete Works Of Project.

Friday, September 12, 2014

Better Read Millennials, Stephen King's Ancestors, and a Piece of Writing You'll Never See

Here's a round-up of cool reading/writing news that I've come across recently and thought you'd enjoy too!

According to a new Pew Research Center Study, as Slate reports, Millennials are better read than previous generations. 

No real surprise that James Patterson is the top-earning writer -- coming in at $94 million this past year -- according to Forbes' list of top earning writers. And, of course, my super-hero Stephen King is also on the list.

Speaking of Stephen King...

He'll be on "Finding Your Roots," hosted by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. on September 23. Check your local listings!

And King has also done a recent interview in The Atlantic where he talks about teaching English...with great sympathy for teachers.

Onto another hero: Margaret Atwood. Unfortunately, you'll have to live another 100 years before you get to read her new work. She's agreed to write a piece for a time capsule-ish art project.

Friday, July 18, 2014

ART

Here's what I've been working on -- stage managing! The guys, in order of trailer appearance are: Emory John Collinson, Matt Radcliffe, and Aaron Jennejahn. The director is Sarah Sheppard Shaver.